Love Chic

Intersections

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Blind Clothing one-shoulder dress, CMG wedges, SM Accessories necklace, earrings and clutch bag, XOXO watch. Contacts from Japanese Candy.

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Hype this on Lookbook here, Chictopia here.

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Sometimes I get asked how I think of look titles or entry themes. It’s nothing serious or scientific, haha. While uploading the photos, I usually just look for a detail somewhere in the outfit and then try to connect it to the day’s story.

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Like this dress with all its lines. Wore it to a dinner date with some awesome people. Lately I’ve been having a lot of these dinners, with old and new friends from diverse backgrounds and countries. Different folks with different strokes, yet somewhere along the conversation, we find intersecting interests. I’ve been learning a lot from them and loving it. I think the Universe is making up for a couple of years of incidental social constrainment. :)

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On another note of gratitude, to everyone who’s been continually interacting with me through this blog, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and/or YouTube, thank you :) It’s still as kilig and inspiring as the first time, and so lots of exciting things are in the works. Here’s to a great week ahead!

Bloggers United 4

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Bloggers United is in partnership with World Bazaar Festival
Official Sponsors & Media Partners:

Freeway | Giordano | Meister | ETC | Meg | Status Magazine | When in Manila | Spot.ph | TheMall.ph | Candymag.com | Stylebible.ph | Orange Magazine TV | Madhouse Manila

Punchdrunk Panda Artists Collab

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Punchdrunk Panda, purveyor of local graphic-designed merchandise, launched its latest collab collection of footwear and camera straps on November 7.

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The collection was launched during a fun hangout of bloggers and artists on November 7 at Pino Resto Bar in Makati. It’s the newly opened branch of the noted Pinoy-fusion and veggie restaurant in Maginhawa, and they served up comfort food while everyone gathered ‘round to check out the merchandise. Proof that the food was good? Everything was obliterated within a few minutes and we were only able to take photos of these.

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Crispy buffalo wings with a creamy tangy sauce

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Cheese sticks with nori seaweed, and maybe pesto? We’re not the so great it comes to food blogging because we like to just eat and tend not to bother with the names and the ingredients. Apparently, on this day, we’re not the only ones.

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Look at the empty plates beyond. See what we mean?

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The artists for Punchdrunk Panda’s latest collection: Nemo Aguila, Jen Horn, Alessandra Lanot, Manix Abrera and Diego Mapa.

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Jen and Manix look on as Nemo explains the idea behind his designs. (Side note: the strap Jen is clutching is her design, stamp collection. We weren’t able to take photos, but it is an awesome menagerie of passport stamps as an ode to her love for travel. Check it out here.)

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Nemo’s graphic artist background is evident in his designs, which are reminiscent of graffiti drawings.

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Alessandra, who owns Pino and its veggie counterpart Pipino, made a design with all the vegetables mentioned in the folk song, “Bahay Kubo.”

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Diego, who’s a musician and an avid fan of the History Channel series “Ancient Aliens” (just like us!) collaborated with visual artist Dan Matutina on a design inspired by space and the universe.

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Comic artist Manix Abrera of Kikomachine Komix, created a hilarious strip about the dilemmas of capturing the perfect photo. Imagine you and your friends about to witness a beautiful sunrise, and the resident photographer takes too long tinkering with the ISO and shutter speed that you fail to capture the very moment that called for a photo. The characters in his strip ended up missing even the sunset! Yep. Based on a true story.

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For the shoes, Manix created this his-and-hers “forever alone” design, in a show of his trademark humorous take on emo-ness.

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Yes, we know a lot about Manix’s work because (1) Shai used to work with him via email on a regular basis a few years back, and (2) we have all his Kikomachine comics.

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It was our first time to meet him in the flesh though, so of course we couldn’t pass up the opportunity to be fans! Autographs! Haha.

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“Class picture” at Pino’s doodled wall. Clockwise from left: Madz Rausa, Alexis Lim, Charlene Ajose, Jonver David, Jen Horn, Alessandra, Lloyd Salac, Shai, Tin Rementilla, Helga Weber, Diego, Manix, Paul Chuapoco, PdP’s Pauline Santillan, Nemo, PdP’s Nica Kim, Abbey Sy. See more photos at the PdP facebook page!

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Click here to see more photos and details of the collection: men’s topsiders, women’s skimmers and camera straps

BAYO: What’s your beef?

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Last weekend in Trinoma, we spotted this window display—rather, it stopped us in our tracks. We stood in open-mouthed silence for a good thirty seconds, before walking off with a shrug and two words: “What’s new?”

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Many have sounded off about these allegedly racist ads on Twitter, and the controversy has reached news sites. For those who haven’t heard about it or seen the ads in question, this is BAYO’s latest campaign, “What’s your mix?”

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Before writing about this, we wanted to give BAYO the benefit of the doubt, that maybe they would find a way to explain themselves or amend the campaign somehow. Instead of instigating anything, we waited it out, planning to write this only if and when others have seen it and formed an opinion for themselves. But these images had us confused, offended, and unsurprised.

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Confused, because the brand name itself, BAYO, is a Filipino word for “clothing.” BAYO used to have those heartwarming Pinay pride campaigns and endorsers. BAYO used to sell those cute shirts with cursive handwriting that says “Filipino and proud.” (Coincidentally, we had just sold ours in a bazaar or we would’ve taken photos.) We couldn’t reconcile that image of BAYO, the values it stood for, with this blatant promotion of colonial mentality.

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Offended, because yet again, this is proof of the foreigner-worshipping self-discrimination we Filipinos love to heap upon ourselves. We are always bombarded with subtle and not-so-subtle messages of how better it is to be a foreigner or of mixed race rather than “just” Pinoy here in the Philippines, no matter the industry or demographic. Heck, it’s the case even with our pets.

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Unsurprised, because BAYO wouldn’t be the first and only brand to come out with a message that says “You can only be happy, beautiful and successful if you’re white or of foreign descent.” Stop reading this and look around you. Flip open any local magazine, turn your head to the TV, look out your car window or check out your toiletries counter. Chances are you’ll see either of two things: an advertisement featuring a porcelain-skinned beauty of foreign ethnicity, or a product label’s few lines promising whiter skin faster than you can spell “glutathione” out loud.

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The only difference with BAYO is that theirs is a message so in-your-face and so unapologetic that it actually struck a nerve. Because of this campaign, the unspoken truth that has been around us for decades—nay, centuries—came out and bit us all in the arse. The truth that we think of our skin and soft features as inferior to their foreign-ness and aquiline attributes. All BAYO did, fortunately or unfortunately for them, is choose to be all-out in proclaiming it.

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To be fair, the ad campaign could just as well be interpreted as being proud of your ancestry, your roots, your heritage. These models don’t just have Filipino blood to be proud of, but a mix of other ethnicities that make up who they are. The campaign could be seen not as an expression of their superiority over pure Filipinos, but just as that: embracing their identity. There is nothing wrong with that—having something against non-pure Filipinos would be just as wrong and merely the reverse of the current situation. It isn’t about whether mixed or 100% is “better.” As the Black Eyed Peas once sang, “If you only have love for your own race, then you leave space to discriminate.” Rather, it’s about our sheer lack of love for our Filipino-ness. Our lack of confidence, for one, that Filipinos could sell clothes, magazine covers and just about every commodity out there just as well as mixed Pinoys or foreigners can. Our lack of self-assurance that we are just as good.

As we mentioned before, we’ve personally been trying to make a change with what little we can do from within this industry. But let’s face it. Everyone—you, them, us—contributes to this. We can all say we color our hair because this or that shade just looks better. We can all say our contact lenses aren’t transparent because colored irises make our eyes stand out better in photos. We can all say that fair skin is simply easier to dress up/apply makeup on/style/photograph. We can all state the need to look more interesting because consumers and audiences easily get bored with the “ordinary-looking” (translation: black hair, natural skin color, Pinoy features). It doesn’t matter—at the end of the day, we all have a part to play in this dramedy. So, racist or not, can we really complain against the very thing we help promote? What’s the beef, really? That BAYO said those things, or that BAYO said those things out loud?

Next week, we celebrate Philippine Independence Day. Yet, save for a few redemptive moments every now and then, it is doubtful that we will free ourselves from this mentality anytime soon, just as it is certain that this issue will simply die down after a few days and things will go back to normal. And so long as “normal” includes local soap operas with characters in blackface (by the same TV network that produced this and this) and magazine covers with “white is might” implications and editorials that suggest “darker skin is a tweaked kind of perfect” and commercials that equate love and beauty to fair skin and fair skin only, then perhaps all we can hope for is a few tweets of indignation here and there. The way we see it, it isn’t solely BAYO’s misgiving. It is all of ours.

Shop Love Chic! (Bloggers United Bazaar 2)

A sneak peek at some of the awesome stuff we’re selling at the Bloggers United Bazaar.

Necklaces! From sparkly and vintage-inspired to rocker-chic resin and watches, there’s a perfect chain for every mood and outfit.

Charm bracelets for those who love summer, the great outdoors, or the ocean—or just love wearing pretty things.

Bangles for the dainty, the edgy, the glamorous and the pop-lovers.

Funky pop-culture stud earrings make for a unique fashion statement.

Rings too pretty to resist. The gold ones are handmade.
       

How to get free tickets:

1. Open to our followers on Tumblr, Facebook and Twitter.
2. The tickets are from Bloggers United and Multiply, so you have to be following them on Facebook and Twitter as well.
3. Tweet this: “Hey @sephshai, I want free tickets to the @bloggers_united bazaar! #BloggersUnited2”

The first twenty (20) to tweet us will win those tickets. Just make sure you follow these mechanics to the letter, because we’ll be double-checking. Tweet away :)
    
Congratulations to our guest pass winners: (1) Kristine B. Anarcon, (2) Eliza Malferrari, (3) Patricia Cariño, (4) Mary Ann C. Cortez, (5) Ma. Victoria M. Pangilinan, (6) Mary Aurabel D. Salas, (7) Ivy Grace F. Rivera, (8) Mary Angeline D. Salas, (9) Ross Martin D. Moreno, (10) Camille Peteros, (11) Francesca Diomano, (12) Toni Elarmo, (13) Sherry Yao, (14) Regine Salumbre, (15) Judecen Ivy Torres, (16) Eva Marie Soquena, (17) Jennica De Castro, (18) Amanda Joyce Paredes, (19) Klarence Tolosa, (20) Joselle Allyssa T. Frilles. See you there!